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Pearl Harbor Attack Remembered 72 Years Later

Pearl Harbor Attack Remembered 72 Years Later

Solemn ceremonies marked the 72nd anniversary of the Japanese attack on Pearl Harbor.  A ceremony began at 7:45 a.m. at the World War Two Valor in the Pacific National Monument at Pearl Harbor. Pearl Harbor survivors, retired and active duty service members, dignitaries and others were in attendance. At 7:55 a.m., there was a moment of silence when the first Japanese planes dropped their bombs.  Missing from this ceremony is the missing man flyover.  The F-22 Raptors usually piloted by the Hawaii Air National Guard are under orders not to perform.  Spokesman Lieutenant Colonel Chuck Anthony said there have been restrictions on all kinds of flyovers across the country, and the Hawaii National Guard was unable to get an exception for this traditional flyover.  Another ceremony at Hickam Field remembered those who lost their lives there that day.  The 7:55 a.m. ceremony was at the flagpole in Atterbury Circle, a site which still shows the original bullet holes and strafing marks from the attack.   And, at 1:40 p.m. the Blackened Canteen Ceremony was scheduled aboard the USS Arizona Memorial.  Dr. Hiroya Sugano, Director General of the Zero Fighter Admirers Club honors fallen Japanese and American soldiers.  Two Army Air Force B-29s collided and crashed during a bombing raid over Shizuoka, Japan in June 1945. Twenty-three Americans and more than 2,000 Japanese died.  The canteen was pulled from the wreckage - the same canteen Dr. Sugano uses to pour whiskey into the waters of Pearl Harbor as a symbol of peace, honor and reconciliation. 

 

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