Photos

 

Big Brand Makeovers

  •  
    The New Heinz Ketchup Bottle What's Changed: Heinz decided its ketchup bottle needed a makeover after 110 years, dropping the gherkin and opting instead for a tomato that plays a much larger role in the logo than the previous pickle. "We really felt that the tomato is the hero of ketchup," said a company spokesman.
  •  
    Sears Warehouses What's Changed: Following on the successes of Costco and other warehouse stores, Sears is trying out the concept with a test store in Joliet, Ill called "MyGofer." The prototype will allow consumers to order online and pic up their purchases at a drive-through.
  •  
    Ruby Tuesday What's Changed: The national restaurant chain went through a drastic decor makeover in 2008 to make the furnishings more upscale and sleek, a change from its former look of Tiffany-style lamps and antiques. Total cost? $65 million.
  •  
    Holiday Inn What's Changed: Holiday Inn is in the process of a $1 billion makeover of its hotel locations as well as its logo. All locations that are spruced up will get the new logo, which will be a stylized white H on a green square, rather than the green script familiar from most highway views.
  •  
    M&M's What's Changed: The high-end chocolate market is expanding, so Mars is trying to cash in with M&M's Premiums, a specialty line of the candy which was launched in 1941 as a treat for soldiers that wouldn't melt in the battlefield. The new version comes in brightly-colored boxes, rather than small bags.The biggest difference is that the new version does not have that signature crunchy candy shell, but instead has a softer glaze and each nugget is larger than a regular M&M.
  •  
    Super 8 What's Changed: The new Super 8 logo is more whimsical, with cursive script and a big red eight, than the previous boxy version. This is just part of a rebranding effort by the 33-year-old discount hotel chain that plays up new amenities like free wireless access, free premium cable or satellite and in-room coffeemakers and hair dryers.Franchise owners have until July 2009 to implement the changes that were put in place in May.
  •  
    Popeyes What's Changed: Popeyes is sporting a new look with an orange and red logo with the words "Louisiana Kitchen" set off by fleur-de-lis designs and a giant "P" in the middle -- the better to emphasize the almost 40-year-old chain's New Orleans roots. Gone is the blue-bordered logo that the company deemed not fancy enough to go after the upscale audience it seeks to court.
  •  
    Strawberry Shortcake What's Changed: Strawberry Shortcake got more than just a new dress or two when she got a makeover in early 2008 (just before American Greetings sold the rights to the character to a Canadian company). The '80s icon got a total makeover that includes a few nips and tucks to her physique as well changes to her makeup.
  •  
    PRO-Keds What's Changed: Now owned by Stride Rite, which re-acquired the rights to the sneaker brand from hip-hop mogul Damon Dash (a recent foreclosure victim), PRO-Keds get a makeover as they come back into the fold. Stride Rite focused on classic styles, such as the "Royal" canvas basketball shoe, first introduced in 1949, and gave it an overhaul that was planned to hit stores in November and retail for $50 to $80.
  •  
    Tinker Bell What's Changed: Tinker Bell, a mere side character in J.M. Barrie's 1911 novel and the 1953 movie version of Peter Pan, is going to soon be a leading lady. A straight-to-DVD movie, 'Tinker Bell,' came out October 28, and that will be followed by a line of books, toys, lip gloss and stationery. The new line could mean big bucks as Tink already brings in about $800 million in retail sales for existing products.
  •  
    Avon What's Changed: At 120 years old, Avon is not stuck in its ways. As fashion goes upscale, the company is trying to go with it. New products with premium pricing are the order of the day, and Avon is also concentrating on a world market, with sales up in Brazil, Russia and Venezuela. In 2007, the company signed Reese Witherspoon as the first-ever Avon Global Ambassador, and while she has official duties focusing on health and charity issues, she also promotes products like the Pro-to-Go lipstick.
  •  
    Camel Cigarettes What's Changed: After nearly 100 years, R.J. Reynolds is giving the Camel cigarette box a makeover. While the company has tried numerous brand campaigns in print, the actual product packaging hasn't budged. But now, while the camel picture remains untouched, its milieu is different. The graphics are rounded, the pyramids are larger and the lettering is darker. Color-coded ribbons also identify the style of the cigarettes. The change comes in the wake of R.J. Reynolds vow in Nov. 22007 not to buy newspaper or magazine ads in 2008.
  •  
    McDonald's New Packaging What's Changed: McDonald's has been working for a while on sprucing up its restaurants with modern technologies, and now it has touched up its packaging. The new burger boxes and fry sleeves feature pictures of fresh ingredients like potatoes, lettuce and tomatoes to try to position the food as healthy. Lettering on the containers is bold and contains slogans like "There is only one."